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Tips

Fraud Alert Tips

Fake email received

Beware of this phishing email that's going around.

Actual screenshot of a phishing email

Notice that the message seems urgent and instructs you to click on a link that leads to a website where you are asked to verify and provide personal details.

Remember, Metrobank will NEVER ask you to verify your personal and sensitive account information via a text message, a phone call, or via an e-mail message.

Here's what you should do:

  1. Do not reply to the email, and never click on the link or button provided in the message.
  2. Please report the incident by forwarding the phishing email or attaching it to an email message and sending it to fraudalert@metrobank.com.ph.
  3. You may also report the incident to the Metrobank Contact Center at (02) 88-700-700 or 1-800-1888-5775.

 

How to fight fraud by spotting a possibly fake SMS

Metrobank advises the public to be aware of scams and other forms of fraudulent activities using its name. Metrobank will NEVER ask you to verify your personal and sensitive account information via a text message, a phone call, or via an e-mail message.

The latest and most widespread fraud activity nowadays is a legitimate-looking SMS or text messages from your bank. It asks you to give your personal information to gain access to your bank account. This method is called "smishing," which combines the terms "SMS" and “phishing.”

The intent is to lure you to disclosing sensitive, personal data, such as banking records, user account information, passwords, and credit card information.

Smishing as fraudulent text messages

Here are examples of smishing:

Example of smishing

Screenshot of actual smishing message

Example of smishing

Red flags

These are text messages that look like it is from Metrobank. Often, the message is urgent and instructs you to click on a link that leads to a website where you are asked to verify and provide personal details. In this example, you’re being warned of an “account closure” if you fail to verify your mobile number. It will name drop the bank’s product, and will push you to act immediately so the matter is resolved.

What should you do:

  1. First, take a screenshot of the message.
  2. Do not reply to the SMS, nor should you click on the link provided in the text message.
  3. Report the smishing attempt to the Metrobank Contact Center at (02) 88-700-700 or 1-800-1888-5775.

 

‘I lent my debit card to my son’ and other holiday habits that could lead to fraud

The holiday season is a time for fun, relaxation, and reflection. But it is also the season for fraudsters.

While we don’t want to spoil your holiday shopping plans, these are some of the common holiday habits that could lead to fraud. So, read on:

Lending your debit card to your child or family member. While there is nothing wrong with trusting your debit or credit cards to family members, you are also at risk of exposing your personal information. Card details can be mistakably shared to fraudulent websites when used to shop online. Remember, the responsibility falls on you to secure your card information.

Giving to ‘Christmas’ charities. Giving to charities is good. But fraudsters are now using charities to trick you into giving away your personal information, or worse, cash. Be wary of these dubious charities, especially those thriving online. There are legitimate organizations that deserve your Christmas donation.

Instagramming your travel. Never overshare personal information. While you love to share your recent adventures with friends and followers, you are also leaving yourself vulnerable to fraudsters who exploit your being away. Criminals target people who are away using information they gather on them through public social media posts. If you need to be away for a long vacation, be more discreet with your social media activities.

Winning an online raffle. If you receive an e-mail, an SMS or an online chat saying you won an online raffle, you’re close to being scammed. And because it is also the season for fraudsters, be wary of unknown messages received via these channels claiming you’re a winner of raffle that you don’t know of. Fake raffles use unknown or even private mobile numbers or a fake identity recently created on social media accounts. Legitimate raffles carry government certifications (such as those coming from the Department of Trade and Industry), a company name, and a promo period.